Tuesday, February 9, 2016

famously bitter...


a bit more on wormwood (Artemisia)... 




 "In Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, the first thing Snape asks Harry in Potions class is, "Potter! What would I get if I added powdered root of asphodel to an infusion of wormwood?"


According to the Victorian Language of Flowers, asphodel is a type of lily meaning "my regrets follow you to the grave," and wormwood symbolizes bitterness and sorrow.  The entire question has a hidden meaning of "I bitterly regret Lily's death.""







19 comments:

  1. Interesting... And apparently what JK Rowling told Rickman was this tidbit...

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    1. Jim, "Always" was the key, I think.

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  2. It is embarrassing for me to admit that I have not read a single Harry Potter book nor have I seen the movies. My entire family (especially my grandchildren) look at me with shame when I say this.

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    1. Annie, No need to walk the path of shame, If you read the first book, please let me know what you think. As for the grands: You are missing out on a great adventure is all, and they want to share that with you.

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  3. The Harry Potter series is great literature to get young people to read and enjoy reading.

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    1. Love to see youngsters reading books, expanding their imaginations and knowledge.

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  4. That's so interesting. Maybe I should read those books again, I wonder what else I missed.

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    1. I'm thinking of reading them again, and hunting up more insights.

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  5. What? That doesn't have anything to do with bacon.

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    1. Every good story has a little bacon grease in it... bacon is a secret weapon.

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  6. I did not know that. It is a series full of interesting tidbits.

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    1. There are so many tidbits that one reading will not catch all of them.

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  7. I haven't read Harry Potter yet but just love how it has brought a generation of children to the written word that wasn't just a 140 character tweet.

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    1. Patti, Is it possible for you to find a local youngster that would love to have you read it to them/with... maybe volunteer to read it at the library... two birds!

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  8. Very interesting! I read most of the Potter books and agree with you and your readers--they invited young people (and old!) to read with zest. I would never have seen that clue...nice catch.

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    1. I'm glad you found the tidbit of interest, Cheri.

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  9. Didn't Rowling turn turn the headmaster Gandalf figure gay? That kind of ruined it for me.

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    1. Padre, I'm at that point where the louder they shout the less I care to listen.

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