Monday, July 30, 2018

Old school...




Slough School circa 1893-1960

I started school in this one room school house. Most days I rode my bike, with several other farm kids, the three miles each way.



This is what it looked like when I was a student there.  All eight grades were taught in that one classroom. It had those wonderful old roll up maps of the United States and the World, and a big globe.


 On either side of the front of the building were small vestibules. They had places to hang your coat & lunch pail, and a sink to wash your hands in. There was a soap dispenser, with the nastiest tasting soap ever.  Don't ask...
There was a small shed to the right that housed the boys & girls restrooms.  The restrooms where always cold and full of spiders. Mostly daddy long legs, with the occasional black widow.  Other critters were visitors as well.
 The baseball field and swings were to the left. The swings were the huge old metal ones, that we were constantly trying to swing over the top of. You had to hang tight, cause soft landings were not an option.  There was a merry go round that one could get going fast enough to throw off the unwary.
Here is a picture of the entire school: students, teacher, & superintendent.  This was the last year I attended there.  If you spot the girl with short, curly, (once blonde) dark orange hair (another of mom's experiments with perms and haircuts)... keep it to yourself... lol



 It still stands along with the row of palms that line the road. Now it is private property, and a house was built on the old ball field some years back.





32 comments:

  1. I started school in a similar situation but no photos of it. I wish I had some. I think 1-2 were in one room with the 3-6 in another but am no longer sure.

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    1. Rain, we had all eight grades in one room, it made it for sure interesting.

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  2. I was a "city kid" even though we were on the very far West side of town, and had to get bussed to K-3 because the parish hadn't finished their new building.

    I sure remember the outhouse behind my Grandparent's place, though, and how grateful they were for indoor plumbing.

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    1. drjim, Thankfully we actually had flush toilets!

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  3. What?!? Separate bathrooms for "boys and girls"? Really?

    Brig, report yourself to the nearest reeducation center.

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    1. LSP, LOL, No worries, they gave up on the re-education thing with me, year ago...

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  4. I remember grandmas one holer in Tulare and walking on goatheads in the middle of the night.
    Still hate spiders..heh.

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    1. Skip, We weren't quite that far back, we had flush toilets.
      goatheads are the worst. Except for poisonous ones, spiders don't bother me much.

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  5. I was in several one room schools. One had five students.

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  6. Wow that is something. My mom went to a one room school and she too lived on a farm but rode horse to school and in Montana no less.

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    1. Changes, LOL, now I'm not quite as old as dirty, but gett'n close.

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    1. Woodsterman, You know I had to look up that newfangled word...

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  8. When I moved here to the Blue Ridge in 1986, there was a town called Suches that still had a one room school house. It was the last one in Georgia.

    Two of them are still preserved as memorials up here. One in White County, and one in Union County. I'm glad they didn't tear all of them down.

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    1. Harry, I'm glad they didn't take them all down either.
      My granny taught in a one room schoolhouse and lived with one of the families before she meet my grandpa. The little school house was moved to the museum grounds in the town.

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  9. Great pics, and a different time...

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    1. Old NFO, A much different time, indeed.

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  10. Ron and I lived in a one-room school house in Kansas. He had converted it to a two bedroom, living room, bathroom and kitchen home. We constantly had people come by to see if they could come in and see where they went to school.

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    1. Granny Annie, Ron must have been a very handy fellow. How fun to live in such a place.

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  11. Love this! Thanks for posting it.

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    1. BW Bandy, Thank you for pushing me to do it.

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  12. Great post, I do love old schools. It looks to be in good shape. I imagine seeing it brings up many memories for you. Thanks for sharing it.

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    1. Jenn, Thanks, it does bring good memories. Some of the kids are still friends after all these years.

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  13. Here in the Upper Midwest, they used to make rural, 6 room brick schoolhouses, 4 rooms upstairs, and a basement with 2 classrooms, and a lunchroom / locker room, and a furnace room in the basement. I have always wanted to live in one, or maybe a converted barn.

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    1. SCOTT, Wow, those were big schools. A converted barn would be a great project house.

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  14. I will say to you what I say to our two cats. All the time. I see you.

    I went to 8 schools by the end of high school. And no, none of them caught me so they didn't kick me out. None of them like yours. The closest I came to that was visiting Maine where there was still, on a side road out of Dameriscotta a tiny little one room school left over from (hint, this is where you choose the term you prefer, the mauve age, the guilded age, the speckled age, the great war) I was reading up on the Spanish flu tonight. For some reasons it makes my fingers move faster than my brain. Ah to be young again.
    I live in Shaker Heights and directly across the street from Onoway elementary and the middle schools and the high school. All in all, we have a bazillion kids that come to school in the morning and leave in the afternoon making all kinds of noises that would wake the dead.
    I think a one room school would be restful and far more quiet.

    It wasn't until I went to junior high in Newport that I ever changed rooms at school. There was a different room for every subject. If I could have kicked both the math and chemistry rooms off the planet I would have been very happy. As it was, I was sentenced to catholic school for the eight grade. Just the one room, infested with a minor nun problem.

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    1. HMS Defiant, Loved your comment. I went on to a much bigger school, and than a jr high where we changed rooms for every class. Then to a big Sr high (the only high school in our college town). My Sr class had 500+ in it, war babies!

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  15. My mother taught in a one-room school house heated with old wood stove. Rode a pony to and from — interesting stories with older boys antics. Cold and snowy in the winter. I know all about privys comfort in the winter from my youth. In my mom’s time the boys idea of Halloween fun could be tipping one over — with someone in it!

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    1. Oh Joared, What interesting stories your mom must have had. Thanks for sharing.

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  16. If you ever visit the LBJ ranch near Johnson City, TX, they have an identical, one-room school house that LBJ went to as a kid. He hated it, and swore that he was one day going to do something about it, so that nobody ever had to go through the indignity that he had to endure in that crappy little one-room school house. Then he ran for Congress, then was VP and then POTUS, and he socialized public education, more or less, and things are now the way they are, thanks to LBJ and his little one room school house.

    You seem to have fonder memories of your experience, Brig. Maybe you should run for president, and turn back the clock to those good 'ol days.

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    1. Fredd,
      Turning back the clock is a non starter.
      My grandkids have all gone to small country high schools, where the old ways and values still hold true. I'm thankful for that.

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