Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Random thoughts...

 Your thoughts on the new header painting... 

("By Herself" oil by Brett James Smith)

My Sean checked in last night.  He sold old Black Betty! (Harley) to a good friend of his. Said he just wasn't getting time to spend riding.  On another note, the company he's project manager for is going to get him a bigger house with a shop so the family, and dogs can live in Astoria, too. He said they want him to slow down on his work schedule and use more of his vacation time. I asked if they are worried about him burning out. He said he didn't think so, and that they knew he was a workaholic when they hired him.  He sounds good and that's the important thing.    


I have to say I'm sorry to all my sons by other mothers & my grandson, to whom I sent lots of Axe products while they were deployed.  I honestly didn't know it smelled that bad til recently.  Last night as I was watching a documentary"?" an Axe body wash ad came on and the catch phrase was "Smell Ready"...  

OMG, who the heck in the ad agency thought that was a good tag line...  LOL. 

26 comments:

  1. Care packages, whatever the contents, are always appreciated. An aunt would send me homemade pickles and bull berry jelly (some call them buffalo berries).

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    1. What does bull berry jelly taste like?

      Though my baking skills are not that good, I can make cowboy cookies. Sent a lot of them (well packed) down range.

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    2. I don't know what to compare. The color is orange to red and tart. The trees with the berries look somewhat like a Juniper and the berries are tiny. You spread a tarp under the tree/bush and whack away with a club. A five gallon pail makes about two to three quarts. Extremely labor intensive.

      The berries look like those in mountain ash pictures. Maybe what we call bull berry trees are a variant of mountain ash.

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    3. WSF: Shepherdia, commonly called buffaloberry or bullberry, is a genus of small shrubs in the Elaeagnaceae family. The plants are native to northern and western North America. They are non-legume nitrogen fixers.
      Genus: Shepherdia; Nutt.
      Family: Elaeagnaceae
      Order: Rosales

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  2. All care packages in war zones are cherished. Girl Scout cookies and any brand of jerky were the gold mines. Socks, baby powder, baby wipes, and 4-ply toilet paper were also heavily appreciated. The scented soaps and Axe products were the items that were available longest.

    I received a package that was addressed to "A Southern Soldier". It had 5 lb of raw peanuts, a pound of salt, a quart of pickled okra, Moon Pies, Goo-Goo clusters, 6-pack of socks, 2 toothbrushes and 2 tubes of Crest Gel toothpaste. The peanuts were popular and those that had not had pickled okra were impressed. It broke the monotony while we watched AFN college football that fall - we already knew the outcome as it was delay transmission. I didn't share the rest of the care package. It was the highlight of one of my months in Afghanistan.

    Thank you for your support of our troupes.

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    1. One of the items I sent my son when he was at Kandahar was a wrist rocket. It was soon in use giving local kids Jolly Rancher hard candies as they came out to throw rocks.

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    2. What a cool box for "A Southern Soldier".
      I liked to send boxes with things to have fun with as well as all the staples of cookies, power bars, jerky, socks etc. Sent a bunch of bug a-salt guns, wrist rocket chickens and more. The helo guys put the bobble hula girl on the dash of their ride.

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  3. The new header picture is very nice. Very peaceful looking.

    I used to donate to some organization that sent care packages to our deployed troops. Several times I got replies from the people that received the packages, thanking me for thinking of them. Room got dusty whenever I'd get mail with an APO/FPO return address.....

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    1. Thanks Jim.
      I got many letters back from my son's by other mothers and have kept in touch with some of them that are out now. They are family to me.

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  4. The picture is really beautiful. The kids at school were on an Axe thing for a while. It does smell better then sweat. LOL I'm sure the deployed loved to get a package from home.

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    1. LOL, I didn't know Axe was not a favorite. None of my guys wear it.
      Hope all is well with you and crew!

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  5. The new header image is great. I wish I was there! A variation of care packages I've been involved with are Christmas boxes for international sailors at the port of Houston. There's not as much danger in their line of work, but loneliness and longing for home can be just as sharp.

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    1. I'm going to be there next summer!

      Now you've got me wondering if Coasties would like packages...hmmm

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  6. Love the new header! and yes, Axe STINKS...

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    1. Glad to hear you approve of the new header.
      Boy howdy Axe sure does stink, none of my guys wear it so I didn't know.

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  7. I love the header painting, especially the work on the water and the banks. I also like the position of the angler. Beautiful and relaxing. I have no idea about AXE.

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    1. How are you coming along with your painting? It is always interesting to see your latest.

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  8. Love that painting--conveys the sense of quiet and peace, at the same time strength and independence. I'm just catching up with some of my blog friends, seems like the last few weeks have been a haze. Hoping all is well out west.

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  9. Replies
    1. Thanks Odie. Your approval means a lot.

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  10. We made AXE bombs out of that stuff when we got it. Toss one into another tent and watch them come out choking and gagging!! The Commander finally had to put an end to the festivities as the camp began to reek!!!!

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  11. Great banner!

    Keep the Faith.

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