Sunday, October 15, 2017

Two sided affair...




There was a time when the Cowman went to back of beyond Nevada to process some cows that the ranch had bought.  I helped jump his ponies in the gooseneck, packed his foul weather gear, tucked a few surprises in his duffle, made sure he had plenty of preg sleeves, and a big thermos of hot coffee, and waved him off.


He got over there and found a mixed bunch of wild high desert cows.  Mean as hell every last one of them. The Cowman had decided to preg the cows, so only the bred ones would be shipped to the home ranch here in Cali. The open cows and toothless wonders were going to the auction yard. 






The Cowman was to do the preg testing.  If you haven't stuck you're arm all the way up the tight ass of a wild cow in a snow storm with a cold wind nipping at your nose, you don't know what your miss'n. 

The Cowman was bundled up pretty good against the cold, well except for that one arm. Anyway, one ol gal took offense to his method and charged him as soon as she was released from the squeeze chute. Under normal circumstances it wouldn't have been hard to step out of her path, but he was so bundled up and the ground so slippery with snow, lube, and shit that he went down.  Knowing he didn't have time to get back up, he decided it would be in his best interest to roll under the corral fence before she could mash him into oblivion. He made it to the fence, he made it directly under the fence, he got stuck there. Now he was getting mashed on one side, and frozen on the other. Finally, the cow decided he wasn't worth the trouble and wandered off to tell the rest of the gals "she" was headed to better pastures in Calif.

The Cowman came home with frost bite on one side and bruises on the other, 



and the crazy cow,  she was re-marked as open...


  

32 comments:

  1. Don't mess with the Cow Man or you're "Open".

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  2. Range cows can be really mean. I wouldn't want to mess with one let alone give it a PG test. LOL(-: I would have kept her for a guard cow.(-:

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    Replies
    1. CiNdEe,
      She was well suited for the country she lived in, and the predators there, not so much for the home ranch here.

      Delete
  3. The only way I interact with cows is when I grab a Porterhouse steak and toss it into my grocery cart down to the Piggly Wiggly.

    Real cows are big. Really big. And sometimes meaner than snakes, as you well know.

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    Replies
    1. Fredd,
      That's a fine way to interact with cows, keep up the good work!

      Delete
  4. Lucky she didn't end up as dinner! :-)

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    Replies
    1. Old NFO,
      Hah, she'd would have had to hang for a month to be worth eat'n.

      Delete
  5. Haha. Thanks to Cow Man, Fredd can do what he likes best.
    Thank you and God bless you all.

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    Replies
    1. LindaG,
      I'm sure thankful that Fredd is support'n the business!

      Delete
  6. You forgot to pack his cattle prod.

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    Replies
    1. LL,
      I'm start'n to wonder about you and this fascination with cattle prods...
      You don't know this, but he hated those things, and seldom used them. Too many things go sideways when they are used improperly, which is often the case. He was the quietest person when working cattle I ever saw.

      Delete
    2. Cattle prod: Instrument/tool used to initiate a rodeo in an otherwise relative calm cattle work session. soapweed

      Delete
  7. Hi, so happy to have had you stop by GeeeZ, thanks! And you've got some of my fave bloggers here....how did I now know yours?
    If that's a pic of your house above, can I come and spend an afternoon? It looks like heaven.

    And, considering what you wrote above, I had to share a saying that cracks me up every time I use it for a relative or friend who's CHEAP: "Tighter than a bull's ass at fly season" !!
    Not sure if you've heard that, but I love it!

    Also...I see you're from N California...I hope you're safe from the fires....
    Z

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    Replies
    1. Howdy Z,
      Welcome!
      Sorry, the house is a quest cabin on one of Ralph Lauren's ranches in Colorado. I just like the porch. No one in their right mind would have a roof like that in the West.

      LOL, what a saying, and one I had not heard before.

      I am in N Calif, but 150 miles N of all the fires. Sad times for a lot of folks.

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    2. A friend and her husband in Santa Rosa lost their home....got out with the clothes on their back and their cat. NOTHING saved....the husband is a doc with a practice of 5 doctors; THREE lost their homes. Devastating....

      So glad you're safe! And so glad you have that photo masthead...imagine sitting there and reading and smelling trees and relaxing...

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    3. Tough times for the folks there. A HS classmate & her husband lost their beautiful house, but managed to get one vehicle, & their motor home, & their dog out. She was bemoaning the fact that they didn't have time to get her beamer out, I think that was just shock talking. Cars can be replaced, people can't.

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  8. ALSO...it looks like you are an 'old West' fan like I can be depending on the subject! (I live in L.A., so I'm not real up on the stuff but I'm attracted to it)..anyway, the two books I just finished reading came to mind for you since I saw on your Profile you're also a reader: These are REALLY wonderful and I hope you enjoy them if you get them!

    The Diary of Mattie Spenser: A Novel

    Prayers For Sale - A Novel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Z,
      I will sure give your book recommendations a look see. Thanks.
      If you are into the real deal you might enjoy: Letters of a Woman Homesteader by Elinore Pruitt Stewart.
      And of course the books by fellow bloggers: Larry B Lambert, JL Curtis, & Rain Trueax among others...


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  9. That's the best (or worst) rock-and-a-hard-place story I've ever heard. Ah, the romance of ranching, huh? I've learned just enough about it since coming to Texas to know that it's probably best if you're raised into it, or at least get started early and spend the rest of your life working from (as Grandma said) from kin to cain't -- from when you can see until you can't. Love your tales -- real always is best.

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    Replies
    1. shoreacres,
      Thanks, I'm glad you like my cow ranch tales.
      Not sure you have to be raised in it, but you do have to love it to live it.

      Delete
  10. Oh man, she already told the other girls she was headed for California. What an embarrassment.

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  11. Replies
    1. Changes in the wind,
      Thank you, glad you love them.

      Delete
  12. Whatta great laugh producer!
    You have the best stories!

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    Replies
    1. Barbar Cat,
      Laughter is good medicine, Thanks!

      Delete
  13. That’s a great tale! A Vet friend used to complain about occasional unexpected unwanted animal confrontations when he had a large animal practice, until he got old and had to trim down to just treating small animals. I know cattle herd ranching requires a different mindset, but I couldn’t help thinking of the two lovable huggable dear ‘ol Gurnsey milk cows we had for a few years before we moved west. I recall my uncle’s large Holstein dairy herd when I was young, but they would be different creatures, much more docile, too, I’m sure.

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    Replies
    1. joared,
      Thanks. I worked for a vet for a number of years in a combined large & small animal clinic. It was interesting. We found we had more chances of getting hurt from little spoiled lap dogs or cats than the large animals.
      We didn't have many dairy cattle clients in our practice.
      There was a neighbor, when I was in grade school, that had a Holstein dairy. His young daughter was mauled by a bull calf that she had hand raised. It took a long time for her to over come the damage he did. So I think it wise to always realize that any animal can turn on you. Not to be afraid, but just use good situational awareness tactics.

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    2. Yeah, my midwestern uncle had a cavalier attitude about his bull, then got gored once. A Colo. cousin slipped and fell bored in process, while loading a bull that got rambunctious on his ranch. Couldn’t agree more about respecting all animals with care is wise.

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  14. What a great story! So different from the things I know about....having grown up in a big city. That's what is great about all the different people I 'meet' online!

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    Replies
    1. Jenn,
      Thanks. I'm glad you enjoyed it. I've gotten away from writing about that part of my life in recent years, what with care giving my folks, but like to revisit it from time to time.

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