Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Lumbering along...

I was on the beach in Seaside when I got a text from Sean that he was done with his meetings and could give me a tour of the mill in Warrenton.
Willie and I loaded up and headed up there. Sean had said to just follow the signs to find the mill.  I couldn't find the signs, so I parked in a likely place and waited to see if a logging truck would come by.



Sure enough, a few minutes later a logging truck went by me. I followed him right to the mill, and then the very small sign> to the office. 
Sean met me, introduced me to the people he works with, and fitted me with all the safety gear I needed to be in the mill. 

  
This mill produces upwards of two million BF per day.

A Note: This is my description from a layman (mom's) perspective...

Logs are fed into the debarker.
Here are logs coming out of the debarker and being cut to length. (full screen the videos for better viewing)




then they go through a scanner that tells the optimum cuts for that particular log.


the next set of saws cut the log into cants (unfinished logs to be further processed).


After a maze of trips around and through the mill the boards are sent to the kilns.

This mill dries it's lumber in kilns with steam heat provided from an inhouse co-generation system fired by residual wood waste (from the debarker). 


boiler on the L, hog on the R

steam drying kilns
 I just realized that I didn't take any pics of the finished lumber... next time.

Finished up with a pic of Sean & I,



and into the office to thank everyone for letting me have the tour, and to collect the swag that Sean got me...


Sean is project manager for the mill, and just completed a 6 million dollar retro fit project, and starts a 2 million dollar one shortly. It was interesting to see the designs he makes, and implements, as well as the constraints he works with.  

18 comments:

  1. Very nice! And that is a LOT of board feet a day! Many changes from the old sawmill days...

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    1. This is about the fifth mill of Sean's that I've gotten to visit over the years in Calif, Idaho, and Oregon. It has been interesting to see the developments in the processes.

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  2. That's really neat, Brig.

    I've been in many, many factories in my career, but never been to a saw mill.

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    1. Thanks, I'm glad you liked it. If you are ever out this way, I'd be happy to set you up with a tour.

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  3. Replies
    1. LOL, I have a dear girlfriend in Cali that pulled green chain for quite a few years. Mostly computerized now.

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  4. I wasn't the least bit board while reading, and I will knot forget what I learned.
    Your visit to the mill sounded fun.

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    1. LOL... well done.
      It was fun, and interesting.

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  5. How nice that he could give you a tour and what a big guy he is! They have a top notch factory there and not wasting is very important.

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    1. He's always been good about giving me tours of the mills he builds and retrofits.
      They use every bit of the logs.

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  6. I was going to give you trouble about me not being able to view the videos in full screen again ... "Error Occurred" I switched to Firefox and everything was great.

    Thanks for letting me use my map again. I've been through those areas in the motorhome. It's a beautiful area.

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    1. I didn't realize that if you didn't use Firefox it would give you an error message.
      Good on you for following along on the map. It is a beautiful area.

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  7. Sounds great. Thanks for sharing :). You sound very proud of your son

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    1. Thanks, and you are most welcome.
      I am proud of him, he's a damn hard worker, and never asks his guys to do anything he doesn't know how to do first hand himself.

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  8. You have an ANSI hoodie! HUZZAH! American National Standards Institute green is a great color for visibility in winter. The SCOTCHLITE is especially nice. I am glad you can now wander by night, with safety! I actually threw my ANSI coat from my Deputy Days in the truck tonight. It is good to -40. It is currently 18, so I should be OK.

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    1. I do and I love it. It's great for visibility and warmth when taking Willie on evening walks. Down to the 20's here and it's not a dry cold. Stay warm!

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  9. Check out the history of Seaside.
    It's origins are "interesting".

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    1. In my prior post I alluded to that, as I did visit the little museum in Seaside. So much interesting history there.

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