Sunday, December 13, 2009

a forever flannel Granny

Christmas time is here and I'm not ready, again. The tree is up with lights, no ornaments. Wreath has been hung on the front door, without bells. Gus is wearing his Christmas kerchief, oh, there it goes, guess he wasn't into it after all. Chicken castle is finished, but they won't roost in it, preferring the branches of their tree. If it gets any colder we'll have Chick on a Stick for Christmas.
I did manage to re-grout the entire firebox of the fireplace today, so maybe a warming fire as soon as it cures. The emergency, err, Christmas candles are lit.
The spirit has not come over me, yet. I'm trying to make all the presents, but only have them half finished. Have you ever tried to knit and sew at the same time?
Things are so very expensive, and all the commercialism is depressing. Then Himself says that they are going to be laid off work the last two weeks of the year, possibly longer. Come on spirit I need you now. What are the words to that song, aah yes, "sounds like life to me"!
What I really wanted to tell you about was my flannel Granny. I have such great memories of my Granny. She introduced me to Shakespearean theater, the train, the mountain cabin, books, milk cows, books, mules, and the opera in SF.
Every Christmas she got each of us grand kids a pair of flannel jammies. They were homemade when we were little, and always of the best flannel to be had. As we got older they were often store bought but still of that wonderfully thick material. We weren't always appreciative of our flannel jammies, mostly because we knew what was in our boxes on Christmas Day. No surprises there. But the thing is, out of all the presents we have gotten over the years, Granny's flannel jammie presents, are the ones that we all remember. Even after all this time, get the cousins together and the flannel jammies from Granny stories are sure to come up, with laughter to follow. Thanks Granny, miss you, love you, flannel forever.

22 comments:

  1. Sounds like a wonderful granny. Good that she introduced you to so many important things. And who could not appreciate warm, cosy jammies on a cold winter's night?

    The rampant Christmas commercialism is a real turn-off. Our Christmas decorations are modest but tasteful, just enough to mark the day. All I really want from Christmas is some good food, good wine and some lively chat. You can keep all the rest of the palaver.

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  2. Nick, She was a very special lady, and the best Granny a girl could have. She gave me a love of books, the arts,and jammies.

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  3. Whenever I read about someone's memories of their granny, I am just a little jealous in hoping that I can be that kind of memory for my little ones.

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  4. What a lovely Granny! Memories really are the best thing about Christmas.

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  5. My granny taught me laughter.

    Sending special flannel hugs for Christmas from Grannymar

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  6. Tabor: The important thing is that we care enough to try.
    Susan: She was a lovely Granny. We're making Memories as we speak.
    GM: Bless your gran. It was my Dad that taught me laughter. Thanks for the flannel hugs, they feel wonderful.

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  7. This year my son actually asked for sox and underwear. My little boy is growing up. *sniff* *sniff* He wasn't even joking, either. He also wanted an iPod, but we aren't going there.

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  8. I still hate getting clothes at Christmas.
    But many of my Christmas memories are of my Grandmother and the gathering at her house.
    It is good to make gifts. When I was younger I think every relative ended up with a latch hook hanging of mine.

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  9. Nice to have you back and blogging Brighid. Our paternal grandmother too was very special and she would make a particularly tasty medicinal compound, using various herbs and spices, for our Diwalis to help digest the various special food that we would all be eating for days. The name of the medicine is lost for ever but it was always called Patti Marundu. Patti being grandmother and marundu being medicine. One tended to eat more of that than allowed! It was that good.

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  10. I see one Arkansas Patti in your blog posts commenting frequently. I wonder if she is that kind of a Patti!

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  11. Dr John: I guess the clothes were always so useful to me that I liked getting them.
    Rummuser: Thanks for missing me, things have just been a bit hectic for me to post much.
    A Patti is a very special lady.

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  12. It seems like your granny's heart was warmer than the flannel jammies. We should all be so fortunate to have had caring folks around us. thanks for visitingmy post.

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  13. Alice: How the heck did I miss you before. Sounds like your boy is a special guy.
    Lee: She did have a warm heart and I've always known that I was blessed to have her in my life.
    Thanks for coming by and commenting!

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  14. I'm the invisible commenter.

    Thanks for the flannel hug. I needed it.

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  15. Grandmothers must be famous for flannel jammies(-: I got mine too! And they were nice and thick(-: I miss that too!!!! I always buy my kids jammies for Christmas too(-:
    I am sorry to hear about your husband getting laid off for a couple weeks. That is so sad)-:
    I know what you mean too about the commercial part of Christmas. It makes me nuts!!!!
    The Chick on a Stick is a crack up too(-: Our Chickens have a house they get locked in at night. Mainly because the raccoons and other varmits will eat them otherwise!!!

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  16. Alice: I'm glad you liked your flannel hug. If you need another just let me know.
    Cindee: LOL So good to know that I'm not the only one carrying on the Flannel tradition.
    I had a few light colored hens at the begining but the varmits made quick work of them. Haven't lost any since. An ol chicken wrangler I asked said the light colored ones were easy for the predators to spot.

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  17. As evident from your wise post, the true meaning of this season can be found in the acts of special people, like your granny.

    The challenging part for me is staying in the now and not becoming sappy/depressed over those special people who are not in the picture, for one reason or another.

    And as for 1/2 finished knitting projects, I have about ten of those in my knitting basket. Oy!

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  18. CHERI: I'm crafting challenged at the moment and in the middle of mid-terms to boot. Any test taking tips for this granny?

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  19. If I need another, I can just come here and re-read.

    Hey, what happened to the video?

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  20. ALICE: Your welcome anytime. I'm just learning how to do stuff with my blog, so the video was an experience thing.

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  21. Me, my brother and our two cousins only had one grand-parent, and it was our ancient Irish granny who introduced us to The Beatles and to the English tradition of pantomime.

    It was our old granny who would take all of her four grandsons to the cinema to watch The Beatles films as they were released and our memories of her trips to the pantomimes are still very fresh.

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  22. JC: Oh, you were lucky to have such a Granny. I've taken to taping my Dad's stories (he's 86) so they can be carried forward. It has been fun for both of us.

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