Thursday, September 21, 2017

Fall...



Yesterday morning the sunrise over the Sierras was a harbinger of things to come.




  
Thunder boomers  had been building all day, and the sky looked very angry indeed.  Only a few rain drops for all that threatening to do more.


Running errands took me by the clock tower, a mere shadow of the beautiful old building that once stood on that corner.



Cone and Kimball Building
Red Bluff, California
The two-story Italianate building with a corner tower was designed by A. A. Cook and named for the rancher Joseph Spencer Cone and the businessman Gorham Gates Kimball. It was built in 1886 and destroyed by fire in 1984.There is a replica of the clock tower where the building once stood.
 


I was outside in the late evening, when I heard fall coming...


Usually they are heard late at night, as they drift South by starlight.  There was a bunch of honking back and forth, obviously a slight disagreement on leadership and direction.  They eventually settled to the course and were gone from sight.


30 comments:

  1. There's nothing more thrilling than the sound of geese in the fall. It's way too early for them here -- usually they begin showing up late October or mid-November -- but when I hear them, everything has to stop while I try to find them in the sky.

    It's going to be interesting to see how things turn out this year. The fields where I usually find them either have or haven't been affected by Harvey. I haven't been able to get out and about and see how the crops and refuges fared. For now, I'll just enjoy your reports.

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    1. shoreacres,
      I heard them coming, but by the time I ran in and got my phone to take a photo they were nearly gone. Need to remember to pack my phone with me, though I hate the feeling of being tethered to it.
      There are lots of signs of an early fall here, oaks have begun dropping their leaves and the acorns are plentiful and much bigger than normal.

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    2. And might I add that our oaks are dropping torpedo-sized acorns and the Labrador is eating them. She is ten pounds overweight; the vet scolds me. It's all the oaks' and turkeys' faults.

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    3. Cheri,
      That's quite an organic diet she's on of acorns and turkey poop!

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  2. Even though it feels totally like autumn, I haven't seen too many honkers which is odd.

    The honking? Honkers experts say that the honking is them actually cheering each other on. For the past 20 years they've landed in the field across from our house to rest. I can always tell when they're ready to take flight by the amount of honking they do. They'll be totally silent and then they start honking and get louder and louder as it gets closer and closer to take off time. It gives me time to rush out an watch the show.

    My favorite, though, is when they fly so low over the house not only can I almost touch them, but I can hear their wings. It's a magical sound.

    Now - doesn't that make you feel good?

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    1. Adrienne,
      It does make me feel good!
      I like it when they go over late at night and all you can hear is the whisper of their wings. Magical is a good word for it.

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  3. We had some come through here with the rain this week. I almost always run out to watch.

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    1. Celia,
      Glad you got to see some too.
      Hope the rain is calming the fires and smoke!

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    2. Rain really, really helped here.
      \

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  4. That's not cheering each other on. That's an argument:

    "Right, you get to the front and do the hard work, I want a rest."

    "Get stuffed, I did it last time, let him have a go!"

    "Oh yes, and we follow Mr Gets lost on duckponds, do we?"

    and so on...

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    Replies
    1. Dan,
      LOL, you've heard the same as I have.

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    2. Funny, Dan.

      It reminds me of the meme with a cat saying something like, "I'm reciting Shakespeare and all you hear is meow."

      Actually, the lead guy does work harder than the rest and he gets switched out quite often. The ones in line flap their wings opposite each other to create a wind pull to help the ones in back of them - it ends up being sort of a push/pull thingy.

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  5. Did you see my Facebook post the other day about the single goose I saw flying alone and flying NORTH? I figured she must have been about my age:-)

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    1. Granny Annie,
      I did, and thought it was a granny going back to get the stragglers, lol.

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  6. Love this post and especially the clock tower.

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  7. I've heard them more than seen them, but come winter they will land in the field and find a stone circle instead of a pond where the old drains converge, so THAT should be interesting!
    Snow on the summit already, my oh my.

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    Replies
    1. NotClauswitz,
      These were the first ones I've heard or seen, apart from the locals that stay here year round.
      I'm interested to see what comes to the enclosed seep area that you built. A trail cam on that area might show more visitors than you are aware of.

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    2. When the rains come I might put a cam out on the volunteer pear tree that is kinda nearby. Don't get many deer that I am aware of but who knows what else? There were five bunnies cavorting in the field this morning!

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    3. We've been visited by a fair number of turkeys, deer, coyotes, and assorted other critters of late.

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  8. The Cone and Kimball Building of yore looks an awful lot like the Geiser Grand in Baker City, Oregon.
    Regarding the southern migration of the Canadian geese. They were all over the place in Idaho and seemed in no hurry to leave. Montana too.

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    Replies
    1. Cheri Block,
      They do resemble each other. Your post was the motivation to go and find a picture of the Cone Kimball Bldg as I remember it. It was a huge and wonderful old department store when I was first married. They had the the vacuum tubes that sent your payment up to the offices on the second floor and sent your receipt back down.

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  9. We often get thunder like that when it is really hot and humid. I call it heat thunder, for lack of a more accurate name. They rarely do more than make noise.
    I do love that sky.
    I hope you have a blessed weekend.

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    1. Linda G,
      It has been much cooler here of late, but one of the neighbors said this morning, we are forcast to get triple digits again next week.
      A blessed weekend to you as well.

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  10. We're not there yet, but the butterflies have migrated, so we're getting close!

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    Replies
    1. Old NFO,
      Some of the hummingbirds have left. The non resident deer herds are moving down here from the high country, making night driving a bit more risky.

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  11. We were surprised with to inches of snow at the same time. It's been in the 20s at night since.

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    1. Woodsterman,
      Wow, that's not a good surprise so early in the fall.

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  12. Love the pics -- Fall's just beginning to make an appearance here. In the meanwhile it's a sauna.

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    Replies
    1. LSP,
      Thanks Padre. Don't envy you the sauna effect. It's has been warmer this week 90*s, but it's a dry heat, and the nights are cool.

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