Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Trouble...

Trying to make the daily trips to the oncologists for Dad's radiation treatments an adventure.

The Christmas tree, which I'm leaving there, is enjoyed by all, except it appears the cleaning staff who unplug it on the nights they clean. I plug it back in, and the tastefully decorated tree with flashing strobe lights brightens the place right up.

There are several patients that are scheduled close enough together that we all spend time together in the waiting room.
The cast:
Henry (patient) is wheel chair bound, and lives at the vets home out by the airport. His medical transport ride is often late picking him up. We all have medical transport on speed dial now.  Henry is quite a cheerful talker, and as it turns out a very good harmonica player.  I asked him to bring it and play for us. The others in the waiting room tried to give me the stink eye, but as I smiled and nodded to each of them in turn they consented to go along.  "I would love too," said Henry! Next visit he brought it, and oh the sweet, sweet music that came from that harmonica.  We got a bit loud with calling out tunes for him to play, everything from hymns to beer hall polkas. A standing ovation followed. Henry got a squeezebox for Christmas! The music will play on...

Charlie brings his nice wife (patient) each day. Charlie never takes off his ball cap, has a ponytail, a long Fu Manchu mustache, and a perpetual look of being startled. Can't quite figure him out, he never looks you in the eye. Dad always yells at him, "Hi Charlie!" and the man nearly levitates. I've asked Dad to go easy on him, as not everyone wants to be his friend. Dad's response is better not repeated.
Lucy (patient) is an elderly little sprite of a woman, always wears red, and always has a tam o' shanter on her bald head. She is up beat and loves to set by me and tell me stories.  She walked out with us today and I heard Dad say, "I don't want to appear rude Lucy, but how old are you?" Her perfect reply, "old enough!"

Maude (patient) and her husband sort of wander in each day. She can't talk much, but those eyes spark up when she finds something we've said funny. Her husband is a tall drink of water, and packs Maude's huge purse for her with all the aplomb of a well pecked rooster.
 
Today I brought a bag full of Christmas Crackers for all of them. I had mentioned that the grandkids & I had a tradition of having them at Christmas, and how much fun they were. None of them had ever even heard of Christmas Crackers. So today they got to have fun. I handed them out to those in the waiting room, and the office.  One of the office girls said she hadn't had one since leaving England, where they had really loud ones. Next year, I'm ordering from England, more bang for my buck! After popping them open there were quite a few people wearing crowns and playing with the games and toys.  They might have looked like dysfunctional chuck cheese kids, but they were all laughing...

 I don't think of myself as Trouble, but the office staff seems to have a different opinion. They let that slip today, when secretary Barbie slid open the window and said, "I'll sign in Dad for you, Trouble!" aaah, thanks.

29 comments:

  1. Maybe just tell them that you're a berserker... They'll get it.

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    1. LOL, they have no idea what a berserker is, and it might be better to keep it that way...

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  2. Trouble is good. Keep it up, Brighid.

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    1. There are those who would contest that Trouble thing, but don't fret I plan to anyway...

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  3. Christmas Crackers are always Trouble with a capital T. Keep up the good work!

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    1. We have so much fun with those simple things! I aim to keep on...

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  4. You have a new family, it seems. Yes, I can imagine you were a trouble maker even more so in your youth, but I will bet that every single person looks forward to the days that you and your dad show up, because they never know what can happen. And music, sweet music, does heal the soul. You have made me realize, that although I helped my mother during her last months, I was not there for her during the she year and dad made these same visits.

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    1. Me a trouble maker... never! just ask me, no need to bother any family or friends.
      I'm quite sure you were there for your mom when it counted, when she really needed you.

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  5. Trouble is good, wouldn't it be worse if you grouched all the time, or sat in a corner and said nothing! Trouble is very good! Happy new year to you and your dad, may it be an easy one for both of you. Hugs from across the pond.

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    1. Haha, You say that cause you think your out of it being across the pond! Happy New Year to you, may you have sunshine and laughter aplenty.

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  6. Well, look on the bright side, you're NOT a wallflower... :-) Glad you've pulled the group together! Laughter IS great medicine!

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    1. Nope, I'm not a wallflower, but actually pretty quiet most of the time. Shared laughter bridges many gaps.

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  7. Christmas crackers! One of the few times 'grownups' can become a child again - and no one cares! A happy and Blessed New Year to you and yours, Brighid!

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  8. My Dear, I look at you as the head of the cheer leading squad. I don't say this often, but God bless you for you're doing his work.

    Happy New Year to you and Dad!

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    1. Happy New Year Woodsterman! You have much to look forward to with that little grandson. Blessed Be.

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    2. I second Odie, 100%. I know you have brought great cheer and genuine love where it was lacking. You do that. :)

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  9. It sounds like you are bringing cheer to a rather un-cheerful place. That is always a good thing! I sat with my Dad at the radiation appointments too. It was a tough thing. I wish you had been there!!!!! Happy New Year!!!!!

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    1. Cindee, I would have liked being there for you & your Dad. Happy New Year to you and your family!

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  10. Waiting in an oncologist's office can be a sobering experience ( I know, I have spent lots of time there with my mother), but I found that the staff did the best it could, considering their tasks. Most people are not feeling well. Your intentions in the waiting room are precious and deep down, the staff probably appreciates your drift. Good for you. These memories will stay with you forever. I know this to be true.

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  11. Cheri, The staff here are under a lot of pressure and wonderful caring people. I like that they feel comfortable enough to tease both Dad and I. They are loving Dad and More than one of them has said they would take Dad home with them any time.

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    1. Oh yes...My mother charmed everyone at the oncology center...she was so sweet and so appreciative...I know your dad has that same persona. Rustically charming?

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    2. Rustically charming fits him perfectly.

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  12. You and your dad are taking great care of the oncology waiting room and will be forever loved for it. My Ron used to spread cheer even to those not caring to be involved and we too made friendships. I wish I had documented the cast of characters as you have done.

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    1. aah Annie, Bless you for standing with your Ron. He watches over you still, I think.

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  13. It's the little things that last in people's minds. Silly string. Crackers... collecting tadpoles. These little aspects of attention are what make proper memories.

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    1. K8 so nice to hear from you! Hope all is well with you and yours.

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  14. I was moved by that. God bless!

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