Thursday, April 7, 2016

Old West Homes...

I live on the edge of a small town. An old ranching river town. You might have gone roaring through it on the freeway. Unless you drive into town, you will never see the beautiful old buildings.
There is a sense of community in a small town. Yes, everyone knows everyone elses business, which can be troublesome, but it is also a sort of protection. 
The Cowman's grandpa used to drive cattle the 15 miles from the home ranch out West to the rail head here.  Sadly the ol' stockyards are gone, as is the railroad station.  Thankfully, there are some of the old homes still around.
A girlfriend said she would ride around with me while I took pics of some of the older homes in town. We had a great time as we shared bits & pieces of the history of  some of the houses.  There are a variety of styles, Craftsman to Italianate and everything in between. They are all very old, lived in, and loved. Here are a few of the many...

  






The guys weren't home or I would take you inside. It's stunning inside, and has a huge french kitchen to die for.


































built in 1910





They are putting in new posts at the bottom of the steps, so the steps are roped off.





27 comments:

  1. Beautiful. I love houses with lots of windows and front porches.

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    Replies
    1. Adrienne,
      I do too, I just prefer them in the middle of the back of beyond.

      Delete
  2. These folks look pretty economically safe for a small town that has lost one of its main economic supports. Many times small towns have beautiful old homes that are falling apart because they are lived in by elderly on fixed incomes or lived in by groups of workers. They are doing a good job of keeping the place beautiful.

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    Replies
    1. Tabor,
      Being overlooked by the urbanites is a good thing to my way of thinking.

      Delete
  3. I love those old homes. They don't make them like that anymore.

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    Replies
    1. CiNdEe,
      I like them as well, and they sure don't make them anymore.

      Delete
  4. These century old units do indeed catch the eye. But they also suck the bank account of the owner something fierce. I have a friend who lives in and maintains a 170 year old mansion. He has no life, and is a slave to linseed oil, paint brushes and paint buckets, caulk, table saws, plumbing issues, electrical issues, on and on and on. The place is magnificent. But....

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    Replies
    1. Fredd,
      They are homes, not units! The people that have them are good with what it requires to maintain them. Their choice. It would not be my choice, but I'm thankful they are being saved. History!

      Delete
    2. Units, that's my generic phrase for everything, my apologies. I think it's a military thing. I might even on occasion call you a 'unit,' Brighid. I apologize in advance.

      Delete
    3. Fredd,
      No need to apologize, I should have been more gracious and let it slid...
      You simply must forgive me, my ears are tuned to Cowman speak.

      Delete
  5. Wonderful homes! Places for movie sets.

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    Replies
    1. Granny Annie,
      They are beautiful, I need to find more of the history behind some of them.

      Delete
  6. Thanks for taking the time to photograph these grand dames of another era. One commonality among these homes is that they all have porches, some have upstairs outside space with rails, and most have graceful vertical windows. I had no idea that RB had this loveliness in the old part of town. I love to learn new things while reading blog posts and this one fulfilled that need.

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    Replies
    1. Cheri,
      You are most welcome for the homes visit.
      Come see them, we aren't just rodeos and pickups and rattlesnakes ya know.

      Delete
  7. Wow, no cookie cutters here. Each house has its own distinct character. My favorite was the 4th one. I have lived in really big cities and the really small. Give me the small every time.

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    Replies
    1. A Patti,
      #4 is one of my favorites too, love that key hole window and porch. Small can be a good thing.

      Delete
  8. People are doing a great job keeping them up. It requires infinite love and patience.

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    Replies
    1. ...yes, that plus truck loads of cold, hard cash. Lots of truck loads.

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    2. LL, I was amazed at how many there are that are being saved, loved, and taken care of.

      Fredd, That why they all drive pickups, full size pickups!

      Delete
  9. Beautiful old homes -- we have a fair few here but I get the feeling your town is better put together than mine... Getting ready to have a crew come in and paint the house. It'll look good when it's done.

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    Replies
    1. LSP,
      Oh Padre, send pics of them, and your abode, please! It would be interesting to see what hill country homes look like.

      Delete
  10. High ceilings and big windows! Not a lot of mid-century modern I take it. ;-)

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    Replies
    1. NotClauswitz,
      Now that you mention it there aren't many mid-c modern ones around town.
      Love me some high ceilings, big windows, and wrap around porches. Most of the big two story homes pictured have second story sleeping porches on the back of them. Throw backs to the days when there was no central a/c.

      Delete
  11. I forgot to mention I worked in your town about 20 years ago. It was with the telephone company and I was on loan for about 3 months fixing storm trouble. But why did I have to find those damn wasps in so many splice closures.

    I remember seeing some nice great old houses.

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    Replies
    1. Odie,
      We used to spray starter fluid in the powder river gates to kill the wasps, nothing worse than riding up to a gate, sliding the handle back, and have a bunch of mad as hell wasps attack.

      Delete
    2. If I happened on one of those nests I sneaked away. I would then attack the next morning when it was still cold. I would hit them with wasp spray or WD-40.

      Delete
    3. We couldn't very well wait a day to move or work cattle, so it was blow & go.

      Delete