Friday, April 22, 2016

That time of year...

Spring is a busy time of year in cow country. There is always way more to do than time to do it in. The weather has been kind this year, and everyone I know is going full out to get things done.  
I ran into an old friend at the Round Up rodeo. She said they were very busy getting ready to move their cattle to their ranches in Oregon for the summer. I really miss that part of my life, but it is comforting to know that it still happens, and the families that do it persevere.
What follows is a small taste in photos of a local family's spring marking and branding. I'm happy that they are graciously allowing me to use their photos. 



 branding





double fisted vaccinating


the one that tried to get away



tell'n stories




an play'n a little ball






27 comments:

  1. Those hills are very green - the cattle will eat well this Spring...yes, I know they're moving them to OR, but they'd do just fine in CA. That part of America still exists, but it's becoming increasingly rare.

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    1. LL,
      These photos where taken the beginning of April, and already the grass is headed out and turning. It's important to leave some feed to come home to in the fall. There are some outfits that go to summer pasture in the Sierras. Adapting is the name of the game.

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  2. Now that is what cows and horses should all be about. YeHaw!

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    1. Granny Annie,
      Next time you're in Cali, you need to come visit the real California.

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  3. How come all them cowboys have white hats? Are they all 'good guys?'

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    1. Fredd,
      Personal preference. Damn straight they are, and then some.
      I need you to pm me your address so I can send the prize you won for naming "Hank".

      Delete
  4. That last photo is the best. My husband, not I, was invited to castrate some bulls and bail some hay. It was the most exhausting day he ever had.

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    1. Tabor,
      LOL, if he had eaten the calf fries and baled hay it would have been a better day...

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  5. Those pictures could have been taken 50 years ago. Cowmen and their way to get the job done have changed little.

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    1. A Patti,
      Things change, even in the cow business. Thankfully, family values remain.

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  6. Lots of work, and a little bit of fun. Tis the life!

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    1. Old NFO,
      Yes indeedy! Though I've never met a cowcamp crew that didn't make the most mundane things into some kind of fun.

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  7. Beautiful photos! Wonder if those kids realize how lucky they really are?

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    1. Chickenmom,
      Thanks, I will pass that on to the photographer. They do and so do their parents.

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  8. How wonderful to see in this present time!

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    1. Barbar Cat,
      Thanks for stopping by and commenting. I would have posted a bunch more of the pictures, but didn't want to over whelm with awesome...

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    2. Helps to balance the over whelm of everything else we see in these times. Love seeing families living such lives!

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  9. You know, that reminds me of my childhood. Good times, until you have to castrate your first calf.

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    1. Euripides,
      I had been around it so long, and being pretty darn fast with a knife, by my first calf it was old hat.

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    2. I don't know about you, Rip, but I'm gonna be a lot more careful around Brighid from now on! Especially when she's packing that knife. LOL!

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    3. Shades and shudders of Lorena Bobbit.

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    4. Fellas,
      LOL, No worries, I only use it on livestock.
      There was a time that I was tempted... a really cranky ol fart was giving me a lot of flack from where he sat on top of the corral fence. The cowman heard him, rode up and told him "She fast & she's good, she's done close to 200 head and has another 250 to go before dark. If you think you can do it better, which I highly doubt, get off the fence and help. Other wise keep your mouth shut." Nary a peep out of the cranky ol fart after that.

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  10. Never been around it myself being a born and bred city boy. About the closest I get to a Steer (cow) is the dinner table ... KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK OUT THERE!

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    1. Woodsterman,
      You should come watch, bring that grandson, and the little woman. It really is a small glimpse into the work of the people that feed us.

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  11. Considering I live in Texas, I find it ridiculously hard to find a decent cowboy. Love these pics.

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    Replies
    1. Jenny, You need to go where they are! And against popular fiction it isn't a bar, now a team penning event, a roping, cattleman's field day, and the local feed store are a start.

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