Sunday, April 9, 2017

Bloom where you're planted...

Solanum laxum

It's springtime, and the sun is playing hide and seek with the thunder boomers. Inspite of fickle lighting, we are going to go for a walk around the garden and see what is blooming.

Grevillea Noellii
 The Grevillea in the front yard is covered in bright pink blossoms.


Erigeron  karvinskianus     Santa Barbara Daises
 SB Daises are acting as ground cover in the side yard. They self sow and my neighbor is cussing, because they have invaded his vinca minor borders.  It's survival of the fittest around here, I tell him.

Lavender, Crape Myrtle, Gazania
 Onward past the Crape Myrtle and Lavender border.
Well dang, we went right past the Dogwoods.  Back tracking, here you go...

White Dogwood
Now for a quick look at the Swiss chard. No blooms but it is colorful and good eating slightly wilted in bacon grease.

Bright Lights Swiss Chard
Opposite the Chard is the Camellia.  She's coming to the end of her blooming cycle, but still putting on a show.

Camellia japonica
Winding our way to the back garden we come to a happy pot of pansies.

Pansies

Further on the Petunias and Pelargoniums have a new flush of bloom. My favorite old fashioned petunias.

Pelargoniums & Petunias
We will end for now with the pot of flags (Iris), they haven't bloomed yet but are getting there. They got off to a slow start as the Jays kept covering up the rhizomes while trying to plant acorns. I kept uncovering them til the Jays finally decide to plant elsewhere.

pot of flags (Iris)
I'll take a photo when the flags bloom, can't remember which color these are, time will tell.

***


25 comments:

  1. You've done an excellent job with your yard and are rightly proud of it.

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  2. Lovely. I wish a few of those flowers would grow here.

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    1. Adrienne,
      Thanks, I need to order some day lilies from you. The damn fortnight lilies that mother put in are a pain. Talked to another landscaper and he would pull them out and put in day lilies, which was my thought as well.

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  3. Very Springy and pretty!!! I see you collect the Mortar and Pestle. I have two someone gave me. My Camilla's are done but the dogwood hasn't opened yet. Next sunny day probably. Iris are about to open. I had the early old purple ones bloom and they are still going strong. Santa Barbara daisies are full of blooms. I bought some marigolds at the store the other day. I usually don't buy them but I wanted some bright colors to look at.(-: We have a Bubble Gum Super-petunia that over winters and is blooming really well now. They are really cheerful.

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    1. CiNdEe,
      I collected the mortar and pestles from ranches we lived on. One ranch had a small knee wall, at the old abandoned homestead, made of over turned mortars. I took one back to our house, was gone for a couple days, came home to discover the ranch owner had hired some yahoo to doze around the old house. He destroyed all of the mortars in the process. I was heart sick.

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  4. I like those Daisies and wonder if they'd make it here. All of my gardens are still under snow. In fact we got another 8 inches yesterday. I think I've had enough this year. Brig, brace yourselves in the flat lands because there's a lot of water coming your way.

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    1. Woodsterman,
      Santa Barbara daisies are Fleabanes and it is too cold for them in your 1A zone. Michaelmas daisy (aster novi-belgii) is the only alternative I can think of that would do well at your elevation.
      I bet you are tired of snow, and more snow. Hope you are taking things slowly. No worries about water for me, I'm at 368 ft elevation, on a hill, in the rolling hills.
      It's a damn shame we don't have those much needed dams in place to capture some of that water...

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  5. Enjoyed the tour, as for the chard, I'll eat almost anything cooked in bacon grease. Hugs to you.

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    1. Celia,
      Glad you came along for the tour.
      LOL, I know I like bacon grease!
      Hugs your way.

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  6. Love the camellia and petunia. Nice shots.
    I have some of my mother's ashes in my dressing area with a comforting picture behind it. The ashes are in her college mug from Mill College. I have also put some mementos into the mug. Even though I know she is long gone, it comforts me to know her ashes are there.

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    Replies
    1. Cheri Block,
      Thanks!
      Dad is home now, in his den, just waiting for the flight schedule to be arranged. I'm not keeping any of his ashes, I have him in my heart and mind.

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  7. Very pretty. Your spring is ahead of ours

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    1. Rain Trueax,
      Thank you, work'n on it. We have had all kinds of weather this spring and the plants are loving all the rain. I really need to go see the wildflowers blooming on the plains to South of me.

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  8. 'You're'. Sorry, I had to do it. Your yard is looking good.

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    1. Mark Hartman,
      Thank You!
      Fixed it, and don't be sorry, I should have caught that. Just glad y'all had the guts to call me on it.

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  9. OK, so I was all puffed up that the crocus finally bloomed. I have a couple of daffodils who are thinking about it. I'm jealous about the chard, it will be July/August before mine looks that good!
    My brother-in-law asked DH if he had started planting his gardens yet. Was told if we had, it would be a crop of rice. There is just so much water around here. Mud season has lasted way too long around here. Of course today the temp got up to 70+!! So, hopefully we will have lots of flowers soon. Day lilies are also invasive, and tough!!

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    Replies
    1. Suz,
      Nothing wrong with gett'n puffed up about crocus blooms. You will have gorgeous flowers when we are fried to a burnt crisp around here.
      I'm not sure I've got the strength to dig out those big clumps of Fortnight Lilies. They are too close to the house to use dynamite or fire... which were my first choices...

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  10. So many things I do not know how to do or have the ability to do. Happy to have your accomplishments to admire. Can't wait for my neighbors garden to produce:-)

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    1. Granny Annie,
      Thank you, we all have different talents, and that's a good thing.
      My friends all put in large gardens, so I'm just bidd'n time til they produce...

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  11. Replies
    1. Changes in the wind,
      Thank you for stopping by!

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  12. I spotted those Santa Barbara daisies right away, and thought, "Those sure do look like prairie fleabane." Well, yes. In the family, anyhow. And I laughed to see you calling the iris "flags." I didn't know that term when I first came to Texas. Then, I read a biography of a fellow one county over who was buried at "the flag pond." I assumed it was a pond with a flagpole. Silly me. Now, I know.

    I love pansies. They're a winter bedding plant here, and usually are put in about November or December. They thrive right through, until the great landscaper hordes show up to tear them out and put in snapdragons.

    After my mother died and was cremated, I kept her ashes in my bedroom for a few months, among her African violets. I know she was pleased. :-)

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    1. shoreacres,

      There are so many different common names for plants, and some depend on what part of the country you live in. My granny always referred to her Iris as "flags". So that is what I have called them. It is an old fashioned term.
      My pansies have been going strong for a few years now. I'm not much for yanking out plants that are doing well to have seasonal color, besides it's expensive.

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    2. The gardeners around here would agree with you. The professional landscapers who work for the subdivisions are the rip-em-out crew. We hate it. Never mind the expense -- if they'd put in natives, a lot of critters would be better off.

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