Saturday, August 10, 2013

Even Trade

People that farm for a living are, for the most part, amazingly generous. They are often in the forefront of giving of their time, energy, and knowledge in their communities. But, even they have their limits...
We all see people pulled over by one of the fields, stuffing their vehicle with what ever is growing there. Does it never cross the mind of the person that they are impacting the livelihood of another?
Marymine & her husband are farmers, and have had crops (including newly planted orchard trees), fuel, chemicals, and equipment stolen.  They simply cannot be everywhere at once, so when they do run across someone Stealing they can get rather creative in the solution. 
Last summer as Marymine was headed to town for parts, she spotted a man in a vine seed watermelon field. He was loading up the back of his pickup with melons. The field was one of theirs. She drove out to where he was, rolled her window down and asked him if he belonged in that field.  He replied, "Yeah, I'm just loading melons to sell down the road."
"Really, you know the owner of this field?"  
"Oh yeah, he gave me permission."  
"Well, I happen to own this field, and know you don't have permission to be here, put the melons on the ground and leave."  
He didn't seem to want to do that as he kept getting melons, so she stepped out of her pickup, walked over to the back of his pickup, picked the new handyman jack out of the back, and started back to her pickup.  
"What the hell do you think your doing, he said, that's my jack!  You can't take that!"
 "I am taking it, and I'm going to sell it, just like your taking my melons and selling them. I look at it as almost an even trade."   
He got in his pickup and roared off.  Never saw him around again. 

 

16 comments:

  1. Sounds like she might have at least broken even . . . :) It is surprising how far we've gone down the road of "they have so much, I deserve part of their hard work just because . . ." Sad to see.

    ReplyDelete
  2. BILL: It is sad, and the mentality that goes with it. Why people can't respect the property of others is beyond me. My daughter & SIL have a lot, but they have worked smart, long & hard for every bit of it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Bravo Marymine! I don't get what is so hard about the concept that if it isn't yours leave it alone. Sadly I fear as I age I grow less fond of people in general.

    ReplyDelete
  4. CELIA: We seldom hear about the good people out there, but I believe that they are still quietly working their magic.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Wow! I could almost accept it if the people who stole crops were actually hungry. But they're not. Just greedy.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I would have likely done worse to the thief. That's a clever solution.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm with LL, I'm afraid I'd have made it EASY for the cops to find him...

    ReplyDelete
  8. That was a creative way to handle what could have been a scary situation. I use to see well dressed tourists in out of state cars pulled over by the orange groves in Florida helping themselves.
    Pretty sure they didn't intend to sell them but never could understand why they thought it was perfectly OK to just take all they wanted. Sigh.

    ReplyDelete
  9. NELLY: The ones that are hungry are usually pretty easy to spot, they ask permission.
    LL: I have No doubt sir!
    OLDNFO: Creative problem solving without involving LEOs is not recommended.
    AP: I have never understood the mentality that says because it's growing right by the road, it's permissible to STEAL.

    ReplyDelete
  10. They load up your crops and then leave their unwanted house pets.

    ReplyDelete
  11. GRANNYANNIE: What is the most unusual drop off you know of? Ours has been a pigmy goat.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Simply take an axe to the vehicle tire sidewalls and call 911.

    ReplyDelete
  13. We used to steal a couple watermelons when we were kids, but a truck load? The farmers knew we did it and they would hire us when it was time to load the trucks. We would cull out the ones that didn't look good and could take as many of those that we wanted. After a while, we didn't want to see a watermelon, much less eat one.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I didn't say I wasn't going to involve LEOs, I just said they wouldn't have any trouble finding him :-D

    ReplyDelete
  15. LL: That would do it.

    ROBERT: Think most of us as "young kids" have done the like. This was an adult, stealing to sale, and those were very high production cost vine seed melons.

    OLDNFO: LOL, knew you would most likely catch that slip...

    ReplyDelete
  16. Marymine sure used her marbles with that guy. Her quiet moves taught him a lesson that he will never forget.

    ReplyDelete